Many people with disabilities fear that if they return to work and start earning more money, they’ll lose their Medical Assistance (MA) coverage. Medical Assistance for Employed People with Disabilities (MA-EPD) means that you don’t have to be afraid of this happening. With MA-EPD, if you have a disability and work, you can earn any level of income, build more assets, and keep your MA coverage. MA-EPD pays for the same services that standard MA covers, including visits to the doctor, hospital stays, medical equipment, home care services, and mental health services.

To qualify for MA-EPD, you must be certified disabled by the Social Security Administration (SSA) or the State Medical Review Team (SMRT). You also must also be working, paying Medicare and Social Security taxes, and earning at least $65 per month. When you enroll in MA-EPD, you have to pay a monthly premium for your coverage.

This article will help you understand:

  • If MA-EPD is right for you
  • Different ways you may qualify for MA if you have a disability
  • What services it covers
  • How much you will have to pay, and
  • How to sign up.

If after reading this article, you need more help in understanding MA-EPD, we recommend you talk to trained experts who can help you. Here are some good resources:

What’s New?

How health coverage works in the United States is changing. These are some of the important changes related to MA-EPD:

  • If your assets increase so much that you no longer qualify for MA-EPD, you may be able to qualify for MA through other rules that have no asset limit.
  • If Social Security or the State Medical Review Team (SMRT) determine that your disability does not qualify you for MA, you may be able to qualify for MA through other rules that have no disability requirement.
  • If your MA-EPD premium is high, you may find that MinnesotaCare or individual insurance plans on MNsure cost you less each month.
  • If you don’t have any form of health coverage in 2014, you may have to pay a tax penalty.

For people who already get MA-EPD, the program is not changing. If you get MA-EPD now and your situation hasn’t changed, you will not lose it. However, if you need to change your health coverage in the future, now you’ll have more options.

Note: The Affordable Care Act (ACA) of 2010 has made big changes to our nation’s health care system and there will be more changes over the next few years. DB101 has been and will continue to be updated to reflect these changes. For more information, read our overview article, Health Care in Minnesota 2014.